Food Employee Health Policy

Preventing the Transmission of Food-borne Illness

Escherichia coli, Hepatitis A Virus, Norovirus, Salmonella, or Shigella Shiga toxin-producing are leading causes of the transmission of food-borne illness from a food handler or other food service employee to consumers/patrons.

In the interest of mitigating and avoiding the transmission of food-borne illness to consumers, this interview is designed to inform the person in charge (PIC) of any food handlers or other conditional employees who have displayed the following described conditions in the past or currently displays such conditions.  This action is necessary to protect the health and well-being of everyone.  The PIC will take appropriate steps to preclude the transmission of food-borne illness.

Food Employee Health Program Questionnaire

 

Food Employee Health Program Questionnaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ORGANISM COMMON NAME OF ILLNESS SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DURATION
E. coli (Escherichia
coli)
producing
toxin
E. coli infection Watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps,
some vomiting
3-7 or more
days
Hepatitis A Hepatitis Diarrhea, dark urine, jaundice, and
flu-like symptoms, i.e., fever, headache,
nausea, and abdominal pain
Variable,
2 weeks-3
months
Noroviruses Variously called viral gastroenteritis, winter diarrhea, acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis, food poisoning, and
food infection
Nausea, vomiting, abdominal
cramping, diarrhea, fever, headache.
Diarrhea is more prevalent in adults,
vomiting more common in children
12-60 hrs
Salmonella Salmonellosis Diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps,
vomiting
4-7 days
Shigella Shigellosis or Bacillary dysentery Abdominal cramps, fever, and
diarrhea. Stools may contain blood
and mucus
24-48 hrs

 

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